Step into Christmas

A fresh look at how to dress your tree
Take your tablescape up a level
Create your own bespoke Christmas wreath

Welcome! Christmas is fast approaching, and anticipation is in the air. As you plan your festive journey, write your lists and seek new ways to celebrate the most wonderful time of the year with friends and family, we hope you find inspiration here and also in-store, in the displays our talented teams have created for you! Be sure to check out our exciting programme of events, including The Enchanted Gardens Neverland light trail, this year by special arrangement with Great Ormond Street Hospital Children’s Charity. We'd also recommend a visit to our brand-new Planthouse Café at Wychbold, for warming drinks and festive fayre. 

May I offer you season’s greetings, and we look
forward to welcoming you all
to Webbs this Christmas.

Ed Webb, Chairman and owner

Dressing your tree

There are so many options when it comes to picking a theme for your Christmas decorations, whether you go for a luxury feel with sparkling ornaments and lavishes golds, or the traditional palettes of red, white and green. This year we've embraced the natural world and gone for a woodland theme with cheeky squirrels, whimsical toadstools and glittering ferns.

Dressing your tree

There are so many options when it comes to picking a theme for your Christmas decorations, whether you go for a luxury feel with sparkling ornaments and lavishes golds, or the traditional palettes of red, white and green. This year we've embraced the natural world and gone for a woodland theme with cheeky squirrels, whimsical toadstools and glittering ferns.

Step 1

The first job is to add the lights, unless you have opted for a pre-lit tree! Often, the hardest job is unravelling the lights after a year in the attic. The trick is to remember on twelfth night to wrap them up neatly, ready for the following year. And always test them before you place them on the tree!

Step 2

When you have the lights in place, the best method of dressing the tree is to start at the top and work your way down, using the biggest baubles first.

Step 3

Once you've attached your decorations, step back and identify any 'dark' areas. These can be filled with ferns, fronds, bows or flowers, depending on your theme.

Find your range... Decorations

Fit for a feast

Your Christmas dinner is an hour away, the roast potatoes are browning nicely, a bottle of fizz has just been opened...

It's your last chance to finesse the table

Fit for a feast

Your Christmas dinner is an hour away, the roast potatoes are browning nicely, a bottle of fizz has just been opened...

It's your last chance to finesse the table

Everyone wants their Christmas dinner to look as good as it tastes, and a gorgeous tablescape is the perfect backdrop to the most important meal of the year.

Follow our simple tips to impress your guests even before the food arrives.

The scheme

Christmas doesn’t have to be about the traditional palette of colours. Choose a colour that makes an impact, or a theme that matches the decor of your dining room.

The centrepiece

The perfect centrepiece is impactful, but doesn't take up too much valuable space on the table that will be needed for the food!

The centrepiece can of course be Christmas themed, but you may prefer to go for a classic design like one of our golden candlesticks that can be used again and again, all year round.

If you don't fancy candles, you could use a vase filled with fairy lights to add a rainbow glow to the scene.

The essentials

Remember, your plates and glasses are as much a part of the tablescape as the decoration. Opt for the classics if that's what will best compliment your table, or you could add colourful, or themed plates to bring the table to life.

When it comes to glasses don't make do with an everyday tumbler; whether you're drinking red, white or rose, the shape of the glass really does add to the experience and flavour so have a variety of styles to hand if you can.

The finishing touches

It’s easy to underestimate the impact of a napkin, while functional, it can also add a pop of colour to the table. Ours match with the table runner to tie the place settings with the rest of the tablescape.

We also love a napkin holder – a great way to add a finishing sparkle to the scene – but if you're a dab hand at folding, get creative with your presentation.

Find your range... Tableware

Webbs and Little Pomona release 'The Thankful Receiver' cider

Two champions of local provenance, Webbs and Little Pomona, have joined together to craft The Thankful Receiver, a cider which celebrates local fruit and the cycle of nature, from bee to bottle. Traditional cider apples and juicy eaters combine to produce a cider which reflects vintage and orchard, and can be enjoyed either sipped solo or with food – and arrives just in time for autumn and Christmas.

Louise Webb of Webbs says “We are always looking to bring the best in food and drink to our customers and were delighted to have the opportunity to work with Little Pomona to create something unique for Webbs.”

Louise Webb of Webbs with Susanna and James from Little Pomona

Louise Webb of Webbs with Susanna and James from Little Pomona

Many combinations of naturally fermented ciders were tasted before the final selection was made; a bend using zesty Discovery apples and rich Egremont apples from a local Worcestershire orchard along with barrel-aged Dabinett from Brook House Farm itself.   

Its light natural sparkle means The Thankful Receiver is a very versatile drink.  It can be enjoyed on its own as a refreshing aperitif or paired with a favourite cheese board - the more flavourful the selection, the better.  Alternatively, enjoy it with friends over a wood-fired pizza, a warming autumn curry as the evenings close in, or have fun finding  your own match.

Louise goes on to explain “The name The Thankful Receiver was inspired by the circle of gratitude for all the unseen work that takes place in producing each bottle, from the moment the bees start their work in pollinating the fruit, to the growers, to the laborers who hand pick, to the blenders and ultimately to those who enjoy the cider. We'll be adding this to our dinner table in the coming months, so in true cider tradition, here's to your good health: Wassail!"

Available in-store or online

750cl bottles at £12.99

The wreath lecture

A wreath adds festive flair to your front door through the Christmas season, welcoming guests in from the cold with a cosy and magical impact. They look classy, they smell great and they are simple to customise at home!

There’s an abundance of wreath making classes to book, and even more materials available to buy if you want to do it yourself.

The wreath lecture

A wreath adds festive flair to your front door through the Christmas season, welcoming guests in from the cold with a cosy and magical impact. They look classy, they smell great and they are simple to customise at home!

There’s an abundance of wreath making classes to book, and even more materials available to buy if you want to do it yourself.

Why do we hang wreaths on our doors?

The first advent wreaths were used by Lutherans in Germany in the 16th century, but the modern shape arrived a bit later. Lutheran priest, Johann Hinrich Wichern, made a wreath in 1839 using the wheel of a cart to teach children of the meaning of Christmas, and to help them anticipate its approach.

The tradition of making wreaths began centuries ago

The tradition of making wreaths began centuries ago

If we look back even further, to ancient Rome and Greece, members of society would handcraft ‘coronas’ (ring-shaped decorations) from fresh branches, leaves, fruits, twigs and flowers and then hang them on their door as a symbol of victory.

The Romans were pioneers, even in their use of wreaths

The Romans were pioneers, even in their use of wreaths

But wreaths are no longer restricted to religious celebrations, or even the festive season; spring, halloween, and autumn are also great times to decorate with a wreath. And why limit them to your front door? They can be used very effectively indoors to decorate sideboards, or hang on a mirror in your home.

Make your own bespoke wreath

A step-by-step guide to making your own

1 A wreath: there’s a variety of plain wreaths available - or start from scratch with a pre-made ring to add foliage to. Micro-lights: cool, warm, rainbow, whatever your preference to bring a glow to your wreath. We recommend battery operated.

2 Extra foliage: Don't be shy – when it comes to foliage, more can be more, whether that's faux foliage, available in our stores, or gathered from your garden.

3 Pine cones: can be gathered in your local wood or bought in store, and used au naturel, or painted to add a splash of colour. Decorations: use your Christmas tree decorations to add more depth - we loved using the clip-on mushrooms to give a woodland feel and complement our pine cones.

4 The final flourish: If, after decorating and shaping your wreath you still feel it needs a bit 'more', a few pieces of dried citrus fruit can add a natural touch, and a great smell.

Feel inspired?

Come and visit us in store where our friendly, expert staff are always on hand to offer advice

Picture credits: Terry Benson; Brainmaster, Sepia Times/Universal Images Group, Science Source/Photo Researchers History/Getty Images